Kristin Reads | A blog about reading books and life.

Hello everyone. I’m Curt Simmons, narrator of Stephen Whitfield’s romantic desert adventure, Omari And The People. Kristin has asked me to give a little lesson on audiobook production/recording and I’m honored to do so.

I have been self-producing audiobooks for about two years now, so I’m relatively new to the industry and still have a lot to learn, but I think I’m doing okay so far. My overall sense is that the majority of self-producers like me get their audiobook production/narration training via ACX, Amazon’s Audiobook Creation Exchange. I’ve also worked in radio and TV and as an actor in Theatre. That helps too. more […]

Source: Kristin Reads | A blog about reading, books and life.

Why I Write, Part Two

By STEVEN PRESSFIELD | Published: SEPTEMBER 28, 2016
Source:  Writing Wednesdays: Why I Write, Part Two

“There are maybe a hundred writers of fiction whose new books will be reviewed with any broad reach in the mainstream press. Jonathan Franzen, Stephen King, J.K. Rowling, etc. I’m not on that list. My stuff will never receive that kind of attention.

Does that bother me? I’d be a liar if I said I didn’t want to be recognized or at least have my existence and my work acknowledged.

But reality is reality. As Garth on Wayne’s World once said of his own butt, “Accept it before it destroys you.” more […]

Why Stephen Pressfield

Steven Pressfield is one of my favorite authors. In addition to novels, he also writes a lot about writing. The craft, the profession, the struggle. I found Steven in 2001 when I was flat on my back recovering from a spinal fusion.  I’d never been much of a reader and I don’t recall how I stumbled across Gates of Fire, but it transported me.

Others may be more familiar with his novel/movie, The Legend of Bagger Vance, or especially for writers, The War of Art, and Do the Work, and more recently, Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t; Why That Is and What You Can Do About It. 

As a narrator of audiobooks, I find Steven’s lessons learned both instructive and inspiring, as I believe any artist will. He doesn’t pull punches. And the perspective he illuminates is clear, honest, and sobering.

I’m reblogging Steven’s current series from stevenpressfield.com in support of the community I’m building around writers, audiobook narrators, and book bloggers. All of us who love storytelling, whether we write, read, tell, or talk about the story will resonate with his candor, his nuggets of professional advice and craftsmanship, and find a virtual mentor in Steven Pressfield.

Why I Write, Part One

By STEVEN PRESSFIELD | Published: SEPTEMBER 21, 2016 | Source: Writing Wednesdays: Why I Write, Part One

I stumbled onto the website of a novelist I had never heard of. (He’s probably never heard of me either.) What I saw there got me thinking.

What if we worked our whole life and never sold a single painting? The site was excellent. It displayed all fourteen of the novelist’s books in “cover flow” format. They looked great. A couple had been published by HarperCollins, several others by Random House. The author was the real deal, a thoroughgoing pro with a body of work produced over decades.

Somehow I found myself thinking, What if this excellent writer had never been published?

Would we still think of him as a success?

(In other words, I started pondering the definition of “success” for a writer.)

Suppose, I said to myself … suppose this writer had written all these novels, had had their covers designed impeccably, had their interiors laid out to the highest professional standards.

Suppose he could never find a publisher.

Suppose he self-published all fourteen of his novels.

Suppose his books had found a readership of several hundred, maybe a thousand or two. But never more.

Suppose he had died with that as the final tally.

Would we say he had “failed?”

Would we declare his writing life a waste?” more […]

Source: Writing Wednesdays: Why I Write, Part One

Is Listening to an Audio book “Cheating?” – Daniel Willingham

audiobook_orig

“Reading, as an evolutionary late-comer, must piggy-back on mental processes that already existed, and spoken communication does much of the lending.

So according to the simple model, listening to an audio book is exactly like reading print, except that the latter requires decoding and the former doesn’t.” []

Source: Is Listening to an Audio book “Cheating?” – Daniel Willingham

Review of Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t: Why That Is And What You Can Do About It

by Steven Pressfield

I approach this material from what many may consider an unusual angle. I’m sure that authors who have achieved significant success will likely not find much new in Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t. It is not an all-inclusive and defining work and I don’t think it’s intended to be. But those struggling to be published, or follow up that first successful novel, and especially self-publishers will find gold nuggets and inspiration in Steven Pressfield’s work.

I am not an author, but I narrate audiobooks. So my job is to translate the written word into the spoken word and tell a story that is hopefully enthralling to the listener. That means more than simply reading sentences and paragraphs into a microphone. Not that the writing process is entirely alien to me, but I found this book very helpful in my work as I endeavor to faithfully interpret what is written for the eye into a pleasing and entertaining experience for the ear. In fact, before accepting an offer to narrate, my first question for any unfamiliar author whose book I’ve not yet read will be, “What’s the concept of your novel and what is the theme.” Moving forward depends upon the answer.

Thank you, Steven for your entertaining and enlightening story about how to write. I do hear your voice.

Interest in audiobooks rockets, along with other digital storytelling – The Boston Globe

Are audiobooks responsible for a return to an “oral tradition,” due to the “unbridled power of the spoken word” and our evolving culture of multi-tasking? Or, as a narrator, am I simply paying more attention to the industry than before? I think the numbers speak volumes. The audiobook boom is a thing.

“…Despite the forces fostering the audio-storytelling boom, Susan Shipley of Dorchester, who often listens while she knits, sees the rise more as a return than a digital-age innovation.

‘Storytelling was originally an oral tradition,’ Shipley said. ‘When the scribes came along, I imagine the bards thought that was really new.’

D’Acierno of Penguin Random House Audio said she thinks the boom is pretty easy to explain. She believes that there is something natural in the attraction.

‘All of us love to hear stories,’ she said. ‘This is a way to get in touch with that again.’

Source: Interest in audiobooks rockets, along with other digital storytelling – The Boston Globe

Elizabeth Wiley’s Story Inspires

“Even if you’re doing a work of nonfiction, talking about, say, the history of immigration at the turn of the 20th century, you still have to know how to best communicate the through-line of the author’s intent or the character’s thought.”

Source: William & Mary – Giving voice: Elizabeth Wiley finds niche in audiobooks