Goodreads | The Audiobookworm’s review of Omari And The People

4.75★ Audiobook⎮ After finishing Omari and the People, I’m left with both a feeling of wonderment and confusion. Sort of like what I experience at magic shows. On the one hand, I’m in awe. On the other, I’m left a little baffled, but not in an unpleasant way. If you understand how the magician performs the trick, it’s not quite as magical.

Every single second of this audiobook captivated me…(read more)

Source: Goodreads | Jess the Audiobookworm’s review of Omari And The People

Character Voices

I’ve always played with accents and impersonations. They came naturally and quite frankly, they made me crack myself up. Not a lot of accents, but a few. Some fit my mouth quite nicely; the Middle Eastern sound was not one of them. But I’m in the ballpark.

One of the fun/challenging aspects of Omari and the People was that, in addition to the characters, the narrator also sounds Middle Eastern- ish, which makes him a character too in a sense. Something different from that normative sort of inside-your-head type voice. I like the added dimension and how it seems to enhance the storytelling somehow and make you wonder who he is. He’s the tribal historian. Like that wonderful Aussie narrator in the movie Road Warrior. I can never escape that image of the unseen storyteller doing “the tell” around the big tribal fire somewhere lost in the desert. I love romantic fantasy.

If you’re a listener, I’d be interested in hearing about what you need from the narrative voice.

Omari and the People, Fiction or Fantasy?

At the time of this posting, the audiobook version of Omari and the People by Stephen Whitfield, which I narrate, has yet to be released. It will be coming out in a few days and both the author and I still struggle over the genre. That, in fact, is one of the things I love most about Stephen’s genre-bending work, i.e. the question of Fiction or Fantasy is at play for the reader/listener at the heart of the story. However, at this point, I’m not absolutely certain but I think Stephen and I agree that Omari is Magical Realism, a branch of Fiction. Of course, some will disagree with that as well as whether Magical Realism is a branch of Fiction. I like the position taken by Bruce Holland Rogers on Writing-World.com. What is Magical Realism, Really?  “Magical realism is not speculative and does not conduct thought experiments. Instead, it tells its stories from the perspective of people who live in our world and experience a different reality from the one we call objective… Magical realist fiction depicts the real world of people whose reality is different from ours… Magical realism leaves you with… the feeling that maybe this view is correct.” It will be interesting to see in which genre Audible decides to place Omari and the People, the audiobook.